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Category Archives: Book Reviews

Book Review: Skin Game

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Skin Game, by Jim Butcher

★★★★★

Skin Game is the fifteenth book in the Dresden Files series, written by Jim Butcher.  The book follows Harry Dresden, after Mab forces him to join his arch nemesis Nicodemus, on a quest into the Underworld. Read the rest of this entry

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Book Review: Cold Days

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Cold Days, by Jim Butcher

★★★★★

Cold Days is the fourteenth book in the Dresden Files series, written by Jim Butcher.  The book follows Harry Dresden, a modern-day wizard fighting crime in Chicago, taking up his new mantle as the Winter Knight, and having to save Chicago from disaster on Halloween night. Read the rest of this entry

Book Review: Ghost Story

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Ghost Story, by Jim Butcher

★★

Ghost Story is the thirteenth book in the Dresden Files series, written by Jim Butcher.  The book follows Harry Dresden, a modern-day wizard fighting crime in Chicago, following his death at the end of Changes and his attempt to find out who murdered him. Read the rest of this entry

Book Review: Changes

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Changes, by Jim Butcher

★★★★★

Changes is the twelfth book in the Dresden Files series, written by Jim Butcher.  The book follows Harry Dresden, a modern-day wizard fighting crime in Chicago, and his journey to save a little girl from a blood ritual by the Red Court. Read the rest of this entry

Book Review: Turn Coat

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Turn Coat, by Jim Butcher

Turn Coat is the eleventh book in the Dresden Files series, written by Jim Butcher.  The book follows Harry Dresden, a modern-day wizard fighting crime in Chicago, and his adventure proving the innocence of his most hated Warden while discovering the White Council turn coat.


Warning!  Spoilers follow here.

The book starts with Harry opening his door to find Morgan standing there asking for his help.  Morgan has been wrongly accused of killing a fellow warden and asks Dresden to help prove his innocence.  Dresden takes him in, cleans him up, and proceeds to watch over him for the next 48 hours — how much longer Morgan’s veil against the people looking for him will hold up.  Morgan swears he is innocent and woke up in the deceased’s room holding a bloody knife with no recollection of how he got there.  He believes the traitor, who has been feeding information to the enemy for several books, framed him to take the attention off himself while he continues to feed information.  Dresden runs with that idea and seeks out to discover the traitor.  Along the way, Dresden is stalked by a skinwalker — an evil spirit who can take any form.  When Dresden looks upon the skinwalker with his Sight, his mind is nearly disabled at how powerful the being is. He arrives at Will and Georgia’s apartment to take shelter and recover from the vision.  The skinwalker follows him and instigates a fight with the Alphas.  Kirby is killed and Andi is severely injured.  The skinwalker flees.  Dresden, Molly, Thomas, and Morgan attempt to hide in a storage unit.  Binder, a British foe who can conjure these weird gray beings, is introduced and tries to take out Dresden before he can find out anything else regarding the traitor.  Binder, as we later learn, is working with Thomas’s cousin Madeline in cahoots with the traitor.  While Dresden is fighting Binder, Thomas gets snatched by the skinwalker.  After enlisting the help of Murphy and a private investigator named Vince on a side mission, Dresden returns to Demonreach — the island from the previous book — to take everyone out at one time.  The Raiths come with him to aid in the fight.  He brings out the Council, by telling them he has Morgan in his possession, the skinwalker, on the grounds of a swap (Thomas for Morgan), and Binder and Madeline by bringing the Raiths along for the fight.  A huge fight ensues, and the skinwalker shows up toting Thomas.  He has scarred Thomas and turned him into a primal beast.  Listens-to-Wind helps Dresden fend off the skinwalker.  Lara Raith takes Madeline out and Dresden lets Binder go under the agreement to never do business again.  The wardens take Morgan back to Edinburgh to hold his trial and prove him guilty.  At the trial, Dresden uses photos from Vince to reveal that Peabody, the secretary for the Council in Edinburgh, is the traitor.  Peabody enchanted the ink he uses to write with, and when others also wrote with that ink, he harnessed power over them and could control them psychically.  He psychically controlled Luccio to kill the warden, but Morgan made it look like he did it because he loves her and didn’t want her to take the fall.  After a short chase, Morgan kills Peabody and then dies.  Ebenezar walks Dresden back to Chicago and the idea of the Merlin being in on the Black Council comes up.  Dresden decides to team up with Eb and a small group of others to fight against everyone, calling themselves the Grey Council.  The book wraps up with Dresden finally getting to see Thomas since his kidnapping.  Thomas is different and stoic.  After a cold meeting, Dresden assures Thomas that he’s still here for him.  Dresden brings Butters to Will and Georgia’s for game night, which Kirby always held before his death, and they begin a new game.


Where the hell do I start.  I hate what happened to Thomas.  He’s my favorite character.  That shit better get fixed.  The fact that Luccio’s love for Harry was all a result of the mind control was some BS.  The guy just can’t catch a break.  We still know nothing about Michael’s condition from the previous book.  The idea of the Merlin actually being bad is very intriguing, but I don’t see a motive for it.  I do like the secret Grey Council, though.  In the book, it’s mentioned that because Luccio gained a new, younger body she is now receptive to Peabody’s mind control, which is most effective on young people.  I find this a little weak because even though her body is young, her mind and soul isn’t.  I don’t think it should have been that easy to control her. Maybe she wanted a part of it; maybe she’s bad, too.  I never liked her.  Morgan didn’t deserve to die.  He was like the Snape of the Dresden universe.  I give this book a 4/5, because, while gripping, the ending made me feel so much like the HIMYM finale.  So much development to be torn down so quickly.


For Next Time

Changes, by Jim Butcher

Long ago, Susan Rodriguez was Harry Dresden’s lover—until she was attacked and left struggling with the bloodlust of the vampiric Red Court. Now, she needs Harry’s help. Harry’s enemies have found the secret she has hidden for so long, and he will have to unleash the full fury of his untapped power.

-bn.com

Book Review: Small Favor

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Small Favor, by Jim Butcher

★★★★

Small Favor is the tenth book in the Dresden Files series, written by Jim Butcher.  The book follows Harry Dresden, a modern-day wizard fighting crime in Chicago, and his adventure fulfilling his second favor for Queen Mab.


Warning!  Spoilers follow here.

The book starts with Harry playing with the Carpenter children in the snow at their house.  Gruffs attack and everyone runs away to safety.  Shortly after, Dresden is confronted by Queen Mab, who asks that he fulfill his second favor of the three he owes her.  Marcone has been abducted and Mab asks for his safe return.  Dresden sets about to do this when he discovers that Nicodemus and the Fallen are who abducted him. Dresden works with Gard and Hendricks, Marcone’s henchmen, throughout the book to help get him back.  Dresden originally assumes the Denarians want Marcone to persuade him to take up a coin and use his connections to wreak havoc.  As a means of meeting with Nicodemus to talk with him and get back Marcone, Dresden sets up a meeting at the local aquarium as neutral ground and brings along Ivy and Kincaid as neutral parties.  The whole thing turns out to be a setup meant to kidnap Ivy, with Marcone’s abduction having been a huge decoy.  The Fallen want Ivy to accept a Denarian coin to give them an insane amount of power.  Despite a short but intense battle, the Denarians make off with Ivy and Dresden must fight to get her back.  Along the way, Dresden and Luccio strike up a relationship and Dresden is constantly running from the Gruffs – servants of Summer who are out for Dresden for siding with Winter.  Dresden is finally forced to offer up all of the collected Denarian coins, plus Shiro’s sword Fidelacchius, to Nicodemus as a trade for Ivy.  Drunk off the power to wield a Holy Sword, Nicodemus accepts this offer and has Dresden meet him on an island.  Both Ivy and Marcone are being kept prisoner on the island.  Dresden get a strange sensation that the island is familiar to him, and he knows several things about the island once they arrive.  Dresden is accompanied by Michael and Sanya, who throw everyone on the island for a loop and start attacking.  Gard and Hendricks show up in a helicopter and start lifting people into it.  Sanya, Marcone, and Ivy get up safely, but as Michael is being lifted, a Denarian takes a sawed-off shotgun and opens fire right under him, wounding him almost instantly.  The helicopter, suffering from some of the close gunfire, flees, leaving Dresden alone on the island.  After a long battle and a run-in with the final Gruff from Summer, Dresden manages to escape the island.  Thomas and Murphy drive up in Thomas’s boat and rescue him.  Ivy starts recovering, but Michael is left open-ended as to whether or not he’s truly okay.  On a date with Luccio, she tells Dresden that his familiarity with the island is a sign of his Sight strengthening.  Impressed with his ability to ward off Denarian shadows, archangel Uriel offers Dresden the power of Soulfire, a power he can put to good use.  The book ends with implications about Dresden and Luccio’s relationship.


I give this book a 4/5.  I enjoyed it, but not as much as some of the others.  This book does not end with a neat little bow, and is one of the first to do so.  There are lots of open-ended questions at the end.  Is Michael okay?  Why does Dresden now have his sword?  Is Nicodemus actually dead?  Hopefully lots of these will be answered in the next book.  I loved Dresden’s affection toward Ivy and Thomas’s and Dresden’s brotherhood.  I don’t know how I feel about Dresden and Luccio getting together.  And I really want to know who the traitor is, and where they are.  It’s been indicated that the traitor is either on the Council, one of the Fallen, or even in the church.  Seriously, Butcher has dragged this out for like four books or something.  I’d like to think that the next title means we’ll find out, but you never know with Butcher.


For Next Time

Turn Coat, by Jim Butcher

The Warden Morgan has been accused of treason against the Wizards of the White Council-and there’s only one final punishment for that crime. He’s on the run, he wants his name cleared, and he needs someone with a knack for backing the underdog. Like Harry Dresden. Now, Harry must uncover a traitor within the Council, keep a less-than-agreeable Morgan under wraps, and avoid coming under scrutiny himself. And a single mistake could cost Harry his head…

-bn.com

eBook Review: The Fault In Our Stars

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The Fault In Our Stars, by John Green

★★★★★

The Fault In Our Stars is a book by John Green.  The book follows Hazel, a current cancer survivor, and her adventure with Augustus Waters, a boy she meets in support group.


Warning!  Spoilers follow here.

The book is written from Hazel’s point of view and starts at a support group meeting.  Hazel has been to support group several times, but this group meeting welcomes newcomer Augustus Waters.  Hazel is immediately infatuated with him and the longer she knows him the more she likes him.  Augustus seems to reciprocate this infatuation and the two strike up a strong friendship almost immediately.  The two share a love of reading and enjoy sharing their views on life.  Hazel is hesitant to pursue a relationship with Augustus because she feels like she is a ticking time bomb that will leave Augustus alone when she inevitably dies from her cancer.  When Augustus offers his Wish (a parody of the Make-A-Wish Foundation) to Hazel as an offer to meet her favorite author, Hazel begins to let herself fall in love with him.  They travel to Amsterdam, where they realize the author is a mean drunk who refuses to talk to them.  Hazel leaves heartbroken but determined to make the rest of her trip with Augustus enjoyable.  Just before they leave to head back to the United States, Augustus admits to Hazel that he is dying.  He was aware of his illness before they left for Amsterdam but didn’t want to dampen the mood.  Hazel realizes that her fear of being a ticking time bomb is now swapped – Augustus is now dying to leave her alone.  Hazel is by his side every waking minute until Augustus finally passes away.  At the funeral, the author from Amsterdam shows up trying to make amends but by this time Hazel has already written him off.  Before the author leaves however, he and Hazel come to an understanding.  The book ends with Hazel finding a letter that Augustus wrote to the author telling him that you can’t avoid getting hurt in life but you can choose who hurts you.  He admits in his letter that he is happy with his choices and hopes Hazel is too.  Hazel agrees.


I finished this book two nights ago and am still processing it.  If you read this book and all you take away is a story about cancer kids, you have missed the point.  If I were ever to attribute the word “masterpiece” to a book, I would certainly consider this one.  It’s a short book about teenagers, but there’s so much more to it – so many more layers.  So many lessons and thoughts.  I loved the twist about the author (not told above), and I think every girl deserves an Augustus Waters.  There are many religious themes to the book and many questions that are not only left unanswered but justly so.  The book does not leave you feeling curious, but rather leaves open-ended questions that you answer for yourself in your own life.  It is delightfully written, and immensely thought-provoking.  You may or may not suffer from an existential crisis after reading it (I definitely did…there was some ugly crying involved).  I would (and have, since finishing it) recommend this to someone else to read.  I’m also looking forward to the movie, although I was unaware of the film before I started reading the book.  I give it a 5.


For Next Time

KK6: Dark Passage, by Ridley Pearson

The five Kingdom Keepers and their core friends have uncovered a startling truth: Maleficent and the Overtakers (Disney villains) are plotting a catastrophic event that could have repercussions far beyond the world of Disney.

Aboard the Disney Cruise Line’s inaugural passage through the new Panama Canal, the Keepers and their holograms uncover a puzzle hidden within the pages of a stolen journal. The point of that puzzle will reveal itself in the caves of Aruba, the zip lines of Costa Rica, and the jungles of Mexico. A destructive force, dormant for decades, is about to be unleashed. The five Kingdom Keepers are to be its first victims.
-bn.com

eBook Review: Bossypants

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Bossypants, by Tina Fey

★★★★

Bossypants is a book of essays by Tina Fey.  The book is half biography and half host to observations, rants, and recollections of Tina – a television writer, producer, and actor/comedienne.


Tina Fey, probably best known for portrayal of Sarah Palin on SNL or Liz Lemon on 30 Rock, wrote a book of essays detailing several sections of her life from her childhood and respecting her father to motherhood to being in The Biz.  Tina recalls growing up in the ’70s and all the many pop references that come with it.  Her observations are written with adults in mind; a teenager wouldn’t get near the kick out of this book that an adult would.  Tina sheds light on what it’s like behind the scenes of a television series – her chapter on how 30 Rock came to be is the longest in the book and the most informative.  She discusses things that don’t generally come up in everyday conversation, as well as things that everyone respectively experiences but just doesn’t think merits discussion.  Her writing style and casual tone make this book a light and enjoyable read.


I found Mindy’s book, often referenced alongside and compared to this book, more relevant.  There’s nothing wrong with Bossypants – I enjoyed it, but I felt the entire time I was reading it that someone between my age and my mother’s would enjoy and appreciate it more.  I was able to appreciate all of Tina’s comments and observations regarding in-laws and some of her college memories.  The book did not have me rolling in the floor laughing, but rather giving a loud, raucous jolt of laughter every so often.  I really enjoyed being privy to the behind-the-scenes action of 30 Rock, since I love the show so much.  I would not liken Tina’s book to a collection of blog entries like Mindy’s, but rather just what it is – a book of essays.  And that’s okay; it’s still very enjoyable in its own right and I would recommend it to someone if I thought they were either what I consider the appropriate age to be, or was very educated regarding ’70s culture and style.  (I would even add that being a mother would probably increase your chances of enjoying/fully appreciating this book.)  I enjoyed the laid-back style and casual, to-a-friend writing.  I give it 4/5.


For Next Time

KK6: Dark Passage, by Ridley Pearson

The five Kingdom Keepers and their core friends have uncovered a startling truth: Maleficent and the Overtakers (Disney villains) are plotting a catastrophic event that could have repercussions far beyond the world of Disney.

Aboard the Disney Cruise Line’s inaugural passage through the new Panama Canal, the Keepers and their holograms uncover a puzzle hidden within the pages of a stolen journal. The point of that puzzle will reveal itself in the caves of Aruba, the zip lines of Costa Rica, and the jungles of Mexico. A destructive force, dormant for decades, is about to be unleashed. The five Kingdom Keepers are to be its first victims.

-bn.com

Book Review: White Night

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White Night, by Jim Butcher

White Night is the ninth book in the Dresden Files series by Jim Butcher.  The series follows Harry Dresden, a modern-day wizard living in Chicago.  In this book, Harry investigates a string of murders and missing persons where the victims are all magic practitioners.  After meeting up with Elaine, who has come from California to help the organization most of the victims belonged to, Harry finds footage of some of the missing girls leaving with someone who looks an awful lot like Thomas…


Warning: Spoilers follow here.

Harry immediately goes to Thomas’s apartment to talk to him, but Thomas is gone and Harry has to improvise with what is possibly the best scene ever in a Dresden novel and pretend to be Thomas’s lover.  While in the apartment, Harry notices a wall in one of the rooms completely covered in photos and notes of the missing girls.  Evidence is not looking good for Thomas.  After meeting the surviving women of the Ordo, the group that the missing women belonged to, Lasciel informs Harry that a veiled presence was at the meeting.  This veiled presence turns out to be Elaine, who has been hired to help the Ordo.  After discovering Elaine’s veil, the building is set on fire.  Mouse starts barking to wake people up and everyone seems to escape the fire.  Harry sees a gray-cloaked figure running away from the scene, and follows him until he gets into a car and drives away.  Harry follows Gray Cloak using a spell and through eavesdropping finds out that not only is the real killer a Skavis vampire, Gray Cloak also works for Cowl – the mean villain who was supposed to die at the end of Dead Beat.  Cowl finds out that Harry is listening and disrupts his spell.  Harry deduces that the Skavis must have had an informant to give him info about the victims, and he automatically suspects Helen Beckitt, whom you may remember from the first novel.  Helen is a member of the Ordo, and would still presumably be a bad guy, so Harry’s first thought is her.  Helen convinces everyone that she isn’t a spy, and that’s when Harry is shown footage of one of the girls walking away with Thomas.  Everyone heads to Thomas’s boat for answers.  They find Thomas there, along with all of the missing people, who Thomas was protecting and smuggling to a safe place.  Everyone is suddenly attacked by Madrigal, Thomas’s cousin, and a huge group of ghouls.  Everyone cleanly escapes, except for Harry, who falls into the water and is knocked unconscious.  After Harry comes to and everyone appears to be unharmed, he finds Anna, a girl from the Ordo, dead in a hotel bathroom – an apparent suicide.  Helen is missing at this point.  More research tells Murphy that one of the victims was a prostitute for the new Velvet Room, which is now owned by Marcone.  Harry asks Marcone to let him speak to the Madam, and is given Helen Beckitt.  It is revealed after their meeting with Helen that a girl from the Ordo named Priscilla is actually the Skavis, parading around as a girl, and that she is actually the killer.  After a showdown at the hotel where the remaining members and the Skavis are staying, Elaine winds up in the hospital.  Harry devises a plan to fight Madrigal and Gray Cloak, otherwise known as Vitto, and asks Ramirez to help him.  Molly drives them to the Raith mansion where the fight will take place, and stays with Mouse in the car, waiting on further instructions.  Harry and Ramirez are greeted by Lara Raith and led to the Deeps, the same place Thomas almost met his doom in Blood Rites.  Madrigal and Vitto agree to a duel to the death and the battle begins, complete with several vampire onlookers.  Harry takes Madrigal out, and is then accompanied by backup from Thomas, Murphy, Marcone, and lots of Marcone’s thugs.  When it looks like Vitto is almost done for, he calls on Cowl, who opens a passage to the Nevernever, and unleashes an unending flock of ghouls.  Vitto controls the ghouls and orders them to kill everyone present.  While the ghouls are taking their time moving through the crowd of surprised vampires, Harry opens his own gate to the Nevernever and starts helping his posse through.  Suddenly, Harry, Thomas, Lara, and Marcone are all hit with a psychic hold by Vitto, forbidding them to move.  Lasciel appears, and after a long talk with Harry about finally accepting the coin, she helps Harry to not feel the effects of the hold anymore.  He gets up and shoots Vitto’s right hand, severing it and effectively the spell.  Once the spell is broken, Thomas grabs Marcone and they make it into the gate, just before Cowl forces the gate to start closing.  Lara and Harry are left, against Vitto and Cowl, with Marcone’s explosives planted in the Deeps to go off in less than 20 seconds.  Harry has Lara show him to the mouth of the tunnel, and asks her to kiss him.  She does and the kiss gives him enough power to effectively hold up a shield as the explosives go off, shooting them out of the cave.  They land safely in the mansion, where it is revealed that Lara was behind the killings as a way to get everyone’s mind off the White Court so her new leadership didn’t run the risk of being discovered.  Harry demands reparations for the victims’ families and leaves.  He meets up with Ramirez and Elaine at the hospital.  Ramirez is recovering well and Elaine is checking out.  Elaine agrees to give Harry details about each victim to distribute the reparations.  Elaine tells Harry that some of the victims, like Anna, didn’t have dependents, and Harry offers to use that money toward a network that would aid newcomer practitioners and offer self-defense classes, mutual support, and a hotline for supernatural problems.  Elaine happily agrees.  Later that night, Harry notices that the sigil of Lasciel is gone from his hand.  He shows this to Bob, who offers the explanation that she is gone.  When Harry was under Vitto’s spell, Lasciel was able to choose the parts of the brain it affected, namely the parts where she lived in Harry’s brain.  When the spell was disrupted for Harry, she technically killed herself.  Harry finds peace with this, and calls Father Forthill to come retrieve the coin in his basement.  The next day, Harry follows Thomas to a salon where Thomas is washing a woman’s hair and talking in a French accent.  After being ambushed by Harry, Thomas confesses that he’s been attending cosmetology school and working as a night guard to pay for it.  Afterward, he opened this salon and he feeds by doing women’s hair, which is an intimate act.  He gets a little at a time, through each customer, and works all day – which amounts the usual session normally used for feeding.  After finally knowing what Thomas has been up to, Harry just throws his head back and laughs.


This book took me the longest to read, and for no good reason.  I just couldn’t get into it for a while.  But now that I’m done and have the opportunity to read back over what happened, it’s so well-rounded.  I really liked the inclusion of past events here – and Helen Beckitt?  Didn’t see that coming!  I thought it was so sweet how Lasciel put herself out there one more time for Harry before being set free.  I am thrilled that Ramirez is getting closer in Harry’s inner circle, but I’m super curious as to who the traitor is.  I hope it’s not Ramirez!  I want Molly to get even better at magic now that she’s willing to listen to Harry and not defy him.  I’m really-but-not-really surprised at what Thomas’s new job is.  As I was reading that part, I thought for sure he was going to be a masseuse.  That made more sense to me in terms of intimacy.  But when he told Harry that doing the hair would help him to not lose control, I understood it better.  Still don’t know who rammed Harry’s car in the last book.  And there’s more questions left at the end of this one.  I really want the war to be over.  This was a good one, for sure.


For Next Time

Dark Passage (KK6), by Ridley Pearson

The five Kingdom Keepers and their core friends have uncovered a startling truth: Maleficent and the Overtakers (Disney villains) are plotting a catastrophic event that could have repercussions far beyond the world of Disney.

Aboard the Disney Cruise Line’s inaugural passage through the new Panama Canal, the Keepers and their holograms uncover a puzzle hidden within the pages of a stolen journal. The point of that puzzle will reveal itself in the caves of Aruba, the zip lines of Costa Rica, and the jungles of Mexico. A destructive force, dormant for decades, is about to be unleashed. The five Kingdom Keepers are to be its first victims.

-bn.com

eBook Review: Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? (And Other Concerns)

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Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? (And Other Concerns), by Mindy Kaling

★★★★

Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? is a book of essays by Mindy Kaling.  The book plays host to observations, rants, and recollections of Mindy, a script writer and actor/comedian.


Mindy Kaling, a writer for “The Office,” wrote a book of essays detailing her opinions on life, love, fashion, and Larry David.  Mindy recalls several parties she has attended, actors and famous people she has worked with, gigs she took when she was fresh out of college, finally getting hired to write for a television series, and different observations on topics like shopping, eating Indian food, and being a girl.  Her observations are often true-to-life and are also often compared to rom-coms.  Mindy paints not only a classic view of the twentysomething’s life, but also an idyllic picture of what some girls would like their life to be like.  Mindy discusses things that don’t generally come up in everyday conversation, but rather things that are thought of when one is alone in their apartment with time to ponder their life.  Her seldom ranting and general pointing-out of everyday occurrences make her book a joy for anyone to read.


I found Mindy’s book in a list of books that are recommended for someone experiencing a Quarter-Life Crisis.  It was portrayed as a book in the same vein as Tina Fey’s Bossypants, which I have yet to read.  After my local library got the memo that it was 2013 and updated their eBooks, I found Mindy’s book among the most-downloaded titles.  I downloaded the book to my Nook Tablet, and have spent the last three days enjoying it.  The book did not have me rolling in the floor laughing, but rather nodding my head in agreement to many things she pointed out.  Many things she talks about, the topics of her book ranging from being a chubby child at camp to how many pairs of shoes one man should own, are things that we all think about and just never really discuss with anyone.  The book reads very much like Sex and the City to me – just a book of different stories or observations that one can either live vicariously through or relate to.  When I was describing the book to my mother, I told her it was as if Mindy had kept a blog her entire life and just picked the best posts to compile a book out of.  I think this is an accurate description as well.  It’s a lot like reading a book of Tumblr posts, since the topics are so diverse and since Mindy’s sense of humor is like every “Seinfeld” episode: observations about everyday things that no one else deems worthy of conversation.  I enjoyed Mindy’s book and would recommend it to someone else.  I give it 4/5.


For Next Time

White Night, by Jim Butcher

In Chicago, someone has been killing practitioners of magic, those incapable of becoming full-fledged wizards. Shockingly, all the evidence points to Harry Dresden’s half-brother, Thomas, as the murderer. Determined to clear his sibling’s name, Harry uncovers a conspiracy within the White Council of Wizards that threatens not only him, but his nearest and dearest, too…
-bn.com